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Backing up an iPhone

Backing up an iPhone

This article applies for iPhones, iPads and iPod Touches, anything that runs the iOS software. I’ll refer to it as iPhone throughout the article however as that’s what it’s aimed at. The version of the software at the time of writing is iOS 10.3 (it’s pretty similar for the earlier systems too).

iPhone backups are super easy to do, but there are a few little tricks to them. You can back up your iPhone either onto the Cloud, or onto a computer.

The Cloud backup is great in that it will back up all the time, however you are restricted in the amount of data you can save, and it also requires you to have Wifi internet access.

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Posted by duck in Beginner, How-To Guides, 0 comments

Cherokee and Chevereto

Chevereto is some image hosting software that runs on PHP/MySQL. Here’s a few quick notes for how to get it working with the Cherokee webserver.

In this situation I’m using Cherokee 1.2.103 and Chevereto Free 1.0.7 running on Ubuntu 16.0.4 LTS.

This article assumes you have Cherokee set up and already working with PHP-fpm or some other PHP interpreter.

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Posted by duck in Advanced, How-To Guides, 0 comments
Facebook Privacy Settings

Facebook Privacy Settings

Facebook has a tool that lets you check on your privacy settings to make sure your profile is locked down. You should check it out (it will take about 30seconds to do).

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Posted by duck, 0 comments

Hard Drive Formats

Most Hard Drives when you buy them are built to run on Windows Machines and not Macs. To make them work on Mac, you need to format the drive first.

There are 4 main formats, each with their own pros and cons. This guide gives you a quick run down of each format and how to format a drive on a Mac and PC.

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Posted by duck in Beginner, How-To Guides, 0 comments
Using rsync on Mac to Copy Files

Using rsync on Mac to Copy Files

There’s a lack of good file copy utilities on Mac like there is for Windows (eg. Teracopy/Ultracopy). If I need to copy a bunch of files where I’m likely to come across errors copying, I’ll use rsync!

This guide covers how to copy files on a Mac using an external drive or any connected network drive. It’ll skip any errors and log all the failed copies to a file for you to check through. It’s especially handy for copying files while skipping errors, corrupted files and getting past some permissions errors.

This is a beginner to intermediate guide and doesn’t cover some of the more advanced features of rsync.

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Posted by duck in How-To Guides, 0 comments
Backups for PC

Backups for PC

If your computer got stolen, how much data would you lose?  Wedding photos, baby photos, important documents, photos of your recently deceased grandparents?

It’s vitally important that you have a backup solution ready for when disaster strikes, and one backup isn’t enough.

3-2-1 Backup

The basic principle of 3-2-1 Backup, is you have 3 copies of your data, stored on 2 different types of media and 1 of them is off site.

A good example of this is having one backup on an external hard drive at your house (local backup) and an online backup (offsite backup).

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Posted by duck in How-To Guides, 0 comments
Backups for Mac

Backups for Mac

If your computer got stolen, how much data would you lose?  Wedding photos, baby photos, important documents, photos of your recently deceased grandparents?

It’s vitally important that you have a backup solution ready for when disaster strikes, and one backup isn’t enough.

3-2-1 Backup

The basic principle of 3-2-1 Backup, is you have 3 copies of your data, stored on 2 different types of media and 1 of them is off site.

A good example of this is having one backup on an external hard drive at your house and an online backup.

Read more to find out about how to setup both a local and a cloud backup on a Mac!

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Posted by duck in How-To Guides, 0 comments

FreeBSD/FreeNAS arp multicast spam

So, my FreeNAS Server started randomly spewing my log file with this:

Dec 24 16:16:10 zoe kernel: arp: 43:05:43:05:00:00 is multicast
Dec 24 16:16:10 zoe kernel: arp: 43:05:43:05:00:00 is multicast
Dec 24 16:16:10 zoe kernel: arp: 43:05:43:05:00:00 is multicast

It was going at a rate of about 1 a second (in bursts of 5 every 10 seconds or so).
I fired up Wireshark to work out what it was, turns out it was my OpenMesh Wifi Access points sending these packets out.

Read more to see how I fixed it 🙂

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Posted by duck in How-To Guides, IT Issues, 2 comments

3D Printing with Minecraft

My school got loaned a 3D Printer to borrow for a few weeks, now we’ve got a minecraft club. I figured I could combine the two!
The cool thing with being able to export Minecraft to a 3D Printer is that children can do it really easily without having to learn a 3D Design program.

I’ve done a bit with 3D Printing before, I bought myself a PrintrBot Plus when the Kickstarter for it was on, however I could never get my prints to work very well. I ended up giving the printer to some friends and decided that 3D Printing wasn’t for me. That was until my school got loaned an UP Mini 3D Printer. I did a test print and it just worked. Glorious.
The version of Minecraft we’re using at school here is called MinecraftEdu. It’s built for schools and gives you greater control over students (and cheaper licences).
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Posted by duck, 3 comments

Fixing a Barcode Reader Trigger

A few years ago I bought a barcode reader for use in a school Library. It was a Cino 780BT, Bluetooth, nice base station, glorious battery. It was a really nice unit.
One slight issue: The trigger switch on them sucks.  The first one we warrantied and got a replacement, the second one developed the same fault after a year or so of use too. The first time it happened the switch had come loose from the board, so I resoldered it back on (it’s a SMD switch, so there wasn’t much holding it on).
I contacted the company, they wanted me to send it back to them to fix (and charge me for it), the switch would be $20 + labour to fit it. I figured since it was out of warranty I’d give it a shot and see if I could replace it.

I couldn’t find a decent switch to fit (I tried to repurpose a switch from a mouse, but I couldn’t get it to fit right), so I used a switch from my Mechanical Keyboard sampler kit (it has 4 different types of switches to try out to see which one you like).

So: Little bit of soldering and some hot glue later, I have a working barcode reader again!IMG_1432

Read More to see some in progress pictures!

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Posted by duck in Home, How-To Guides, School, 2 comments